The Web has profoundly changed how we relate to information and, in certain cases,
completely reversed traditional influence structures.

THE INTERNET IS NOW THE PRE-EMINENT MEDIUM FOR INFORMATION AND INFLUENCE

The Internet has surpassed print publications to become the foremost vector for information, giving access to an infinite number of  information sources from anywhere, for anyone and at any moment. The growing ubiquity of mobile devices and permanent access to  the Internet is enhancing this domination of the information landscape.

INFORMATION IS NOT EASILY RECYCLED

Contrary to traditional media, content available on the Web is not easy recycled, often piling up and gathering dust in a process known as ‘online sedimentation.’ This is especially true on the first pages of Google and on Wikipedia, where content can remain visible for several years. Yesterday’s information is not replaced by today’s. At the same time, ideas and messages published online are regularly repeated and re-appropriated, even by opinion leaders and decision makers. This further contributes to amplifying the impact of communications.

CONTENT IS OFTEN RADICAL, CONTROVERSIAL AND STRONGLY ORIENTATED

Online expressions of opinion are shaped by specific codes of conduct. Where traditional media ascribes to a set editorial policy, online content is often more subversive and more critical. This tendency is further exacerbated by social recommendation (‘liking’ and sharing), increasing the ‘virality’ and the ultimate impact of information.

INFORMATION IS NEITHER HIERARCHICAL NOR MODERATED AND IS OFTEN ANONYMOUS

The ability of users to generate their own content, often anonymously and without any moderation, has led to the emergence of new opinion leaders. Diverse publications of varying quality are available on the Internet, without any established hierarchy between ‘real experts’ and amateurs. Information published online is consequently becoming more difficult to verify and/or contradict. Compared to traditional media, it is far more difficult to identify authors and their agendas.

Internet users rely on the original pieces of content that take up the first pages of Google search results, relaying the information between themselves until it becomes ubiquitous.

The Internet functions like an echo chamber for traditional media. A symbiotic relationship between the Web and the media helps to sustain both.

0
INFLUENTIAL PERSON CREATES ORIGINAL CONTENT
0
USERS WITH LARGE FOLLOWINGS SPREAD THIS CONTENT
0
USERS CONSUME THIS INFORMATION. THEY MAKE UP THE SILENT MAJORITY OF ONLINE PUBLIC OPINION.

Information sources are diverse and interact amongst themselves.

The Web plays an ever-expanding role as both an information source and amplifier of debates, concerns, and grievances. As such, it exerts increasingly overwhelming influence over the media, decision makers, and public opinion.

  • “INFOWARS” ARE ESPECIALLY FIERCE ONLINE.
  • FROM MAJOR ECONOMIC AND SOCIETAL CONTROVERSIES TO SPECIFIC LOCAL DEBATES, ALL ISSUES HAVE AN ONLINE DIMENSION

Get in touch

Would you like to speak to one of our advisers over the phone or email?
Just submit your details and we’ll be in touch shortly.

Contact Us